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Friday, 31 August 2012

Dual Boot | Windows 7 and Windows 8



Why we Need to Install Windows 8 ?
  • Metro:- Microsoft's touch-friendly Metro interface could be a boon for mobile workers like delivery personnel or store clerks who need to keep their hands free as much as possible.
  • Desktop Virtualization:- With Windows 8 Hyper-V running locally on a PC, enterprise developers can deploy and test multiple versions of apps and operating system configurations in isolated environments on a single system, rather than requiring a PC for each test configuration.
  • Secure Boot :-Secure Boot is a security process designed to prevent malware from infecting computers during startup, before Windows and all of its built-in safeguards are launched. Secure Boot works by confirming that all components contain the appropriate security certificates before they are allowed to launch.
  • Secure Boot :-Secure Boot is a security process designed to prevent malware from infecting computers during startup, before Windows and all of its built-in safeguards are launched. Secure Boot works by confirming that all components contain the appropriate security certificates before they are allowed to launch.
  • File Management :- Windows 8 features several new tools designed to ease file management, especially when copying numerous files. A new interface box gives users a combined view of all concurrently running copy jobs.
  • Windows 7 Compatibility :- Microsoft says apps and utilities that run on Windows 7 will run on Windows 8, meaning that enterprises needn't hold off jumping from XP to Windows 7 in anticipation of Windows 8 becoming available, as their software and development investments should be protected. This is true, but only to a point.

Prerequisite

For this article, I'm going to assume that you have already visited the Windows 8 Release Preview site and followed Microsoft's instructions for downloading and converting the ISO file to a DVD in Windows 7. If you haven't, you should do so before you get started with this article. The process is pretty straightforward and Microsoft has documented the steps you need to follow.

Creating a System Image


The first thing that you'll want to do is create a System Image from within Windows 7's Backup and Restore. When you do, you'll end up with a complete image of your hard disk. That way, if anything out of the ordinary were to occur as you follow the steps for creating a dual-boot system, you will be able to return to your current configuration. Furthermore, I recommend that you also create a separate backup of your data. Maybe just make copies of all your data files on CD/DVD or on an external hard disk. While it may sound like overkill, having an extra backup will give you peace of mind.
To create a system image, you'll need to have a CD-RW/DVD-RW drive, an external hard disk, or access to a network drive. To access Backup and Restore, click the Start button, type Backup in the Search box, and press [Enter] when Backup and Restore appears in the result pane.
Once you have Backup and Restore up, select the Create a System Image option and choose your backup location. As you can see, I used a DVD-RW drive on my system.

Time to Download the Windows 8

Now it's time to download the Windows 8 image file (“.iso”) from the Microsoft website. Click the download link next to your language and PC architecture. If you are unsure of your PC’s architecture, choose x86. Download the image file.

Create the System Image (for Precaution)


  • The first thing that you'll want to do is create a System Image from within Windows 7's Backup and Restore. When you do, you'll end up with a complete image of your hard disk. That way, if anything out of the ordinary were to occur as you follow the steps for creating a dual-boot system, you will be able to return to your current configuration. Furthermore, I recommend that you also create a separate backup of your data. Maybe just make copies of all your data files on CD/DVD or on an external hard disk. While it may sound like overkill, having an extra backup will give you peace of mind.
  • To create a system image, you'll need to have a CD-RW/DVD-RW drive, an external hard disk, or access to a network drive. To access Backup and Restore, click the Start button, type Backup in the Search box, and press [Enter] when Backup and Restore appears in the result pane.
  • On my test system all the partitions on the drive are selected by default. To initiate the operation, just click Start backup. On my test system with a 500GB hard disk, it took over an hour and required eight DVDs.

Create System Image Repair Disc



When the System Image is complete, you'll be prompted to create a System Repair disc. This is the disc that you will use to boot your system and restore your system image in the event that you need it.

Use Shrink Volume for Setup Partition for Window 8



With your System Image discs safely tucked away, you'll use the Disk Management tool to make room on your hard disk for Windows 8
To launch Disk Management, click the Start button, type Disk Management in the Search box, and press [Enter] when Create and format hard disk partitions appears in the result pane.
When Disk Management launches, locate the operating system partition of the drive, right click, and select the Shrink Volume command. As you can see, on my example system, there is a 100MB system partition and a 17GB HP Recovery partition in addition to the 450GB OS, or operating system, partition.

Setup the Partition



For my Windows 8 partition, I set aside 50GB by entering 51200 as the amount of space to shrink the existing volume. Once you've specified the size, click the Shrink button. It will take a several minutes to shrink the partition. When the operation is complete, you'll see the new space at the end of the partition and notice that it is marked as Unallocated. In order to install Windows 8 without any problems, you should covert this unallocated space into a volume with a drive letter. To do so you'll launch the New Simple Volume Wizard.

Select the New Simple Volume command

To continue, right click the new partition and select the New Simple Volume command. When you do, the New Simple Volume Wizard will launch

The New Simple Volume Wizard consists 

The New Simple Volume Wizard consists of five screens - the first and the fifth are shown. As you progress through the wizard, you'll be prompted to specify the size, assign a drive letter, choose a file system, enter a name for the volume, and choose how to format the drive. For everything but the volume name, you should just go with the defaults. As you can see, I specifically named the volume Windows 8 to prevent any ambiguity in later steps. Since the partition was created from your existing partition, you can just go with the Quick format option.

The 50 GB partition is now ready for the Windows 8 installation

When you're finished, you'll see the new partition in Disk Manager. The screenshot shows the new 50GB partition with the volume name, assigned to drive F, and marked as a Logical Drive

The first step in the installation is to specify your language settings Installing Windows 8


Now that you have your partition established and assigned a drive letter, installing Windows 8 in a dual-boot configuration should be a pretty straightforward operation. Let's take a closer look.
To begin, insert the Windows 8 Release Preview DVD and reboot your system. After a few minutes, you'll see the Windows Setup screen and you will specify your language settings before clicking Next.

To get started, just click the Install Now button



Once the initial steps are taken care of, you'll see the Windows Setup screen and will click the Install Now button.

Make sure that you select the Custom Install Windows only option


You'll then see a Windows Setup screen and will need to make sure that you select the Custom option.

I selected the new volume labeled Windows 8 and assigned drive letter F


At this point, Windows Setup will prompt you to choose the location to which you want to install Windows 8. As you can see, on my test system it is showing all available partitions and I have selected the new volume labeled Windows 8 and assigned drive letter F.

As soon as you click Next, Windows Setup will begin copying files to the new partition


After selecting the new partition on which to install Windows 8 and clicking Next, the installation will begin. This part of the operation will take a while so go get yourself a cup of coffee.

The new Windows 8 style boot screen display for 30 seconds before launching Windows 8


When the installation is complete, Windows Setup will reboot your system one final time and you will then see the new Windows 8 style dual boot screen. As you can see, Windows 8 will automatically launch in 30 seconds if you don't choose Windows 7.
If you want to alter the amount of time before Windows 8 will run, you can click the Change defaults or choose other options at the bottom of the screen. There are actually a multitude of options that you can change and I'll cover all of them in a future article. 

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